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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

James Coogan '29 

ASSISTANT EDITORS 

Alice Dansereau '29 Rena McCloud '29 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Walter Kulash '29 

ASSISTANT MANAGERS 

Edith Pearl '29 George Waller '29 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Barbara Bisbee '29 Clary Snow '29 

Winifred Lloyd '30 Davis Snow '29 

Gordon Nash '30 George Waller '29 



CONTENTS 

Editorial 3 

Senior Class 4 

Class Day Exercises 8 

Class Roll 14 

Class Play 15 

Class of 1930 16 

Class of 1931 17 

Class of 1932 19 

Literary 20 

Debating 35 

Song Hits 36 

Athletics 37 

Alumni Notes 39 

Class Grinds 40 



editorial: 



All the World's a Stage 

All the world's a stage 

And all the men and women merely 

players. 
They have their exits and their en- 
trances 
And one man in his time plays many 

parts. 
His act being seven ages. 

When an aged person has nearly 
reached the end of life, and reviews in 
his mind the trail he has trod, and the 
role he has played, is he satisfied ? 
Probably not, for in some scenes he 
has made mistakes, or brought dis- 
pleasure to others or failed in some 
attempt. But all these things must be 
expected, for they are part of the dra- 
ma of life. Many other memories are 
more pleasing and more gratifying, 
that is, if we have done our best, and 
tried to make them so, for no true 
effort is ever wholly lost. If we would 
be pleased, when, in our thoughts, we 
live again our lives, we must try to 
play our part well, make it sweeter for 
others, and struggle onward until, 
finally, we are playing major roles in- 
stead of minor ones. 

If we had an audience, would our 
actions be pleasing, helpful, influential, 
or impressive ? Here again, the answer 
lies in the manner in which we do our 
acting, whether carelessly or conscien- 
tiously. When the curtain falls upon 
our scene, shall we be remembered as 
having played well in every new act? 
Of course that is also up to us. 
Irving believed that a name was 
only an idle boast, and after death 
immortality did not matter. Many 
think differently, but, if we are to be 
remembered, let's be thought of as 
among those who saw the right road 



to take and took it, regardless of ob- 
stacles. 

Of course, the glories would not all 
be the same, and some which seemed 
small have proven really great. 

Do we enjoy the role which has 
fallen to our lot? Of course, it de- 
pends upon the nature of it, but do 
we not create our own path, and, be- 
cause of our disposition, help or hinder 
our success there? If perchance, a 
fellow actor is dissatisfied, and un- 
willing to play his part with a smile, 
might we not encourage and comfort 
him a bit, and so strew a few flowers 
along his way as well as along our 
own ? 

Many other groups of actors crowd 
this great stage, and no character is 
utterly useless. Even though the vil- 
lain only strengthens some fellow actor 
by his base deeds, that is something, 
for as Longfellow said ; 

"Nothing useless is or low 
Each thing in its place is best 
And what seems but idle show 
Strengthens and supports the rest. 

Success 

Success is not the mere accumulation 
of wealth, although a poor man is sel- 
dom called successful. Real success, 
like happiness and contentment, is 
found in the poor cottage as well as in 
the rich palace. Having gained riches 
the man in the high position wants 
more and if by chance he gets it he 
still wants to climb. Success comes as 
he climbs the ladder of advancement. 
Success is the fulfilling of highest 
ideals. The really successful men are 
often those who care little if anything 
about money. True success is the re- 
sult of ambition and is built upon sin- 
cerity and faithfulness. 



THE SENIOR CLA 





BARBARA WELLS BISBEE 

Basketball (2) (3) (4), Assistant Cheer Leader 

(3). Captain Girls' Basketball (4), Alumni 

Notes Editor (1), Class Play (4) 

"Number, please," is Barbara's favorite chant. 
She's a jolly good fellow and boy! how she can 
laugh. Ever since she's been driving that car of 
hers and trying to lead the Girl Reserves, all 
we've been able to get is the wrong number. 



JAMES FRANCIS COOGAN 
"Jimmie" 
President (1) (2). Baseball (1) (2) (3) (4), 
Basketball (3) (4). Soccer (2), President of 
Athletic Association (3). Manager of Basketball 
(3), Athletic Editor of Tattler (3). Secretary 
and Treasurer Debating Society (3) (4), Captain 
of Basketball (4), Pro Merito, Class History. 

Here is the star member of the Senior Class. 
If you don't know your history, ask Jimmie. He'll 
tell you about it. If you want to know vital facts 
about divers persons ask Jimmie, he knows. He 
never sang in chorus until this year. We wonder 
why? Jimmie, old boy. you are our inspiration. 





ALICE MARIE DANSEREAU 

"Al" 

Vice-president (3), Executive Committee of De- 
bating Society (3). Assistant Editor of Tattler 
(4), Class Play (4), Class Secretary (4), Fare- 
well Address. Pro Merito. 

We'll always remember Alice as the one Senior 
who had ambition enough to do things. And she 
does them. As arc evidence enough of it. With 
the record she has made at Burgy she 11 pull 
through way ahead of the game. 



THE TATTLER 



WALTER MICHAEL KULASH 

"Corp" 
Vice-president (1), Secretary and Treasurer (2) 
(3), Baseball (3), Class Play (3) (4), Assistant 
Business Manager of Tattler (3), Treasurer (4), 
President of Athletic Association (4), Business 
Manager of Tattler (4), Basketball Manager (4), 
Executive Committee of Debating Society (4), 
Interscholastic Debating Team (3) (4), Vice- 
president of Debating Society (4), Debating 
Prize (4 , Lincoln Medal, Class Oration, Pro 
Merito. 

Corp is our orator, student, explorer, detective 
and business man. Oh ! yes ! he is one of the 
world's best astronomers, interested in one "star." 





RENA LAVERNE McCLOUD 
"Mick- 
Basketball (2) (3) (4), Vice-president (2) (4), 
President (3), Treasurer Girls' A. A. (3), Class 
Play (3) (4), Secretary Girls' A. A. (4), Assist- 
ant Editor of Tattler (4), Prophecy on Prophet. 
Rena has perfected a snappy walk to accom- 
pany her snappy ways. She loves the woods and 
flowers, especially the "Glens," "Jacks-in-the- 
Pulpit," "Sweet Williams," and all the rest. Her 
chief educational adviser is Wiggie — but she has 
many others. 



EDITH MARIETTA PEARL 
"D.D." 

Basketball (2) (3) (4), Class Play (4), Grinds. 
"D. D." plays her part very well, no matter 
what it is. She has a queer faculty of saying 
things when she should not. But nevertheless 
she's always there with a witty and sharp remark 
to relieve the monotony. 




THE TATTLER 




EVELYN IDA RUSSELL 
Evie 

Class Play (4) 

The only Senior that doesn't argue is Evie. She 
surely is in love with that town of West Chester- 
field whose youngsters she hopes to teach when 
she becomes a pedagogue. With her winning 
smile and manner we would all like to become her 
pupils. 



DAVIS WATSON SNOW 
Dave 

Treasurer (1). Baseball (1) (3) (4), Captain 
Soccer (2), Basketball (2), Executive Committee 
Debating Society (3), Captain Baseball (3) (4). 
Interscholastic Debating Team (3) (4), Presi- 
dent Debating Society (4), President (4), Address 
of Welcome. 

Dave is our veteran orator to say nothing of 
being a debater. All he needs now is fact and 
he'll be able to convince us. He's alreadv con- 
vinced us that at last he is in earnest and means 
to do things. Bon Voyage to France, Dave, also 
through life. 





DWIGHT CLARY SNOW 
"Barney" 

Soccer (1). Baseball (1) (4). School Play (1) 
(3), Basketball (3) (4). Treasurer A. A. (3), 
Jokes Editor Tattler (4), Class Will. 

We all know who Barney is. He abounds in 
everything — even bare C — s. He is the instigat- 
or of outdoor chemistry classes. What strikes us 
funnv is that he has started raisins; chickens. 
Owls would suit him much better. 



THE TATTLER 




GEORGE HENRY WALLER 

"Skippy" 

Baseball (3), Assistant Business Manager Tattler 
(4), Class Play (4), Class Prophecy (4). 

"Skippy" is the quiet kind from up Conway 
way. He does all his work under cover. "Skippy" 
has surprised all of us. Play rehearsals used to 
nerve him up so that he could never ride his 
bicycle home. The wheels weren't warped, either ! 



WILLIAM HERBERT WITHERELL 

"Wiggie" 

Soccer (2), Baseball (3) (4), Basketball (3) 
(4), Class Play (3) (4), Interscholastic Debat- 
ing Team (4). 

Wiggie's favorite is "jawing" even if there is 
nothing to jaw over. He is a charter member of 
the A. O. T. J. (Ancient Order of the Thumb. 
Jerkers) by which method he reached the Yellow- 
stone Park last summer. Ask Rena what Wiggie's 
choice dish is and she'll tell you that it is — apple 
sauce. 




SENIOR OFFICER! 




President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Davis Snow 

Rena McCloud 

Alice Dansereau 

Walter Kulash 




8 



THE TATTLER 



ADDRESS OF WELCOME 



Parents, teachers, friends, we wel- 
come you here tonight as we, the Class 
of 1929, perform our last rites at Wil- 
liamsburg High School. 

During these four years of our high 
school life we have had much to be 
thankful for. We have had our dis- 
appointments and our pleasures, our 
struggles and our victories, but as we 
stand here tonight we may well be 
thankful to have conquered, and to 
have earned the honor of graduation. 

Parents, who can realize the patience 
and undying devotion that have been 
yours ? To you we owe the most, the 
honor of being here tonight. By 
your hard labor and sacrifices you have 
made this possible and we hope that 
in the years to come you will not be 
disappointed in your faith, but will 
watch with that same undying devo- 
tion the ones you love climbing higher 
and higher on the ladder of life. We 
welcome you with pleasure. 

Teachers, we wish to thank vou for 



your kind help and guidance through 
these four critical years of our lives. 
You have not only shaped the course 
of our studies, but you have also 
moulded our characters. We thank 
you for your kind assistance in our 
various problems and welcome you 
here tonight. 

Friends, I, speaking by the kind 
leave of the Class of '29, thank you for 
the interest and support you have 
shown and given us. It is always a 
beautiful thing to feel that there are 
friends behind to help you over the 
rough places in the path of life, and 
we feel this so deeply that it gives us 
great pleasure to welcome you. 

Parents, teachers, and friends, it is 
impossible to pierce the veil of the im- 
pending years, but we hope that if we 
could gaze far into the dim future, we 
would discern that trust and faith that 
you have put in us exemplified. 

We bid you welcome ! 

Davis W. Snow. 



CLASS HISTORY 



For your enjoyment, I'll review 
Our deeds and misdeeds, old and new. 
Some were great and some were small 
But I'll attempt to tell them all. 

Four years ago sixteen verdant 
freshmen entered Williamsburg High 
School with mingled fears and hopes. 
Our spirits brightened when, after 
registration, we were excused for the 
day which part of us spent in the "Old 
Swimming-Hole". 

The next day. work began in earnest 
with assignments and instructions so 



long that we wondered if we would 
ever see that "Old Swimming Hole" 
again. We always knew that Miss 
Dunphy's Latin assignment meant 
about two hours work and Mrs. War- 
ner's Civics about twenty minutes, 
but we never could tell how the 
rest of our time would be divid- 
ed between Miss Merrifield's Eng- 
lish and Mr. Bauer's Algebra. Each 
year we hoped that our work would 
be easier, but we soon found our hopes 
were in vain. With Mr. Coonev there 



THE TATTLER 



9 



was no bluffing and when we bluffed 
Mr. Chapman we read poetry after 
school. Although Mr. Turner used to 
keep us busy with Mathematics and 
Science we remember him best for the 
good times he planned for us at those 
Hi-Y meetings and socials. 

We had always thought that after 
three years of accumulating knowledge 
the last year would be easy, but how 
we fooled ourselves ! 

Latin has grown harder each year 
with Vergil as the climax. That twen- 
ty minutes' Civics has changed to two 
hours of Problems of Democracy; Eng- 
lish themes with Miss Burke have not 
grown shorter, and certainly in the 
Sciences, Mr. Wilder has given us no 
easy time. 

One of our easiest tasks each year 
was to elect a slate of officers, for they 
never realized what was ahead of them 
and the fact that only five of us have 
held office during the four years proves 
it. 

Like all other classes we have had 
to go through the worries of Fresh- 
men Reception but had the fun other 
years of letting the others do the 
worrying. We had Hallowe'en parties 
and Junior-Senior Proms each year, 
but Santa Claus didn't visit us after 
our Freshman year. We have had 
fewer parties than other classes but — 
we believe in "Quality rather than 
Quantity." 

During the last two years all of us 
have had a chance to test our dra- 
matic ability in either "Miss Cherry- 
blossom" or "Jerry of Jericho Road", 
and some have made such hits that 
we may see them on Broadway some 
day. 

Besides our dramatic ability what 



class can boast of a better athletic 
spirit ! That spirit which we began to 
feel early has grown steadily until, un- 
der the efficient coaching of Mr. Wild- 
er, it has reached its height. 

Our class has been active not only 
in dramatics and sports but also in 
debating. In our Junior year inter- 
scholastic debating was tried for the 
first time and two of our number, Ku- 
lash and Snow, were on the team which 
won from both Hopkins Academy and 
Amherst High. This year they were 
again on the team which won a hard- 
earned victory from Amherst, while 
our class sent out another orator when 
Witherell helped our team to win 
against Hopkins. And we were fur- 
ther honored when Corp won the 
Alumni Prize for Debating. We 
realize that none of these honors would 
have come to us or to the school if it 
were not for the untiring efforts of 
Mrs. Warner. 

We have been so busy at our desks, 
on the stage, on the court and dia- 
mond, and also on the platform that 
we have had no time for travel and 
we shall probably always be remem- 
bered by the townspeople as the class 
that preferred Williamsburg to Wash- 
ington. 

It is only within the last few weeks 
that we have begun to realize that our 
graduation does not mean the end of 
work but rather the beginning. 

The successes and failures of the last 
four years which we have just re- 
viewed with you cannot be changed, 
they must stand as they are, but what 
we make of ourselves in the future de- 
pends largely upon how well we live 
up to our motto — -"Carry On". 

James Coogan. 



10 



THE TATTLER 



CLASS PROPHECY 



It was June of the year 1959. I 
was strolling down the long winding 
streets of that historic city of Phila- 
delphia. Unconsciously I walked on 
and did not notice the manhole that 
had been carelessly left open by some 
workman. Suddenly I was grasped 
from behind, just in time to be saved 
from falling. Turning about to see 
who my rescuer was, I saw a well- 
dressed man, who resembled some one 
whom I had seen. Before I could 
speak he exclaimed, "Why, George, 
don't you know Corp Kulash, your old 
Burgy High classmate ?" After a hearty 
handshake, I accepted his invitation to 
go up to his office. After entering the 
building of the Curtis Publishing Com- 
pany, what was my surprise to be led 
right through the waiting room and in- 
to the president's office. Corp calmly 
took the seat behind the desk and said, 
"Sit down!" I could control my curios- 
ity no longer and I burst out saying, 
"Are you the president of this com- 
pany?'' He replied quickly, "Most 
certainly". Then we started to talk 
of high school days and I asked him 
if he knew where any of the other 
members of the class were. He smiled 
and replied, "I know where they all 
are, one of them, in fact, is right here 
in this building, for Alice Dansereau 
is editor of The Ladies Home Journal. 
I inquired why she had not taken up 
teaching as she had planned. He 
blushed and replied, "She liked this 
position better." 

Corp then offered to take me to visit 
the others of the class who had ac- 
cepted positions in Philadelphia. First 
we visited the high school in the cen- 



ter of the city. Here Corp introduced 
me to the principal, a Miss Russell. 
Could this be Evelyn Russell, our de- 
mure and smiling classmate ? How 
she had changed ! After a brief con- 
versation she left to attend to her 
pressing duties which we could see had 
changed her into a woman of care and 
responsibility. 

After leaving the high school we 
drove down the Avenue until we came 
to a new twentA-storv building- which 
I learned was a chemistry laboratory. 
Corp told me that William Witherell 
was the chief chemist and that he had 
been working on a new theory by 
which the sun's rays would be convert- 
ed into electrical energy. "All stu- 
dents highly advanced in Chemistry 
come here to study this new theory," 
Corp said. We went in and found 
Witherell working so hard that I had 
to ask him twice what he was doing. 
He started explaining but I was soon 
lost in the fog, as I had often been in 
chemistry class back in Burgy. 

After a long chat with Bill we went 
to the far end of the city where a 
famous hospital was located. Here we 
entered the office of the superinten- 
dent, Barbara Bisbee, whose efficiency 
in training nurses had given this hos- 
pital its tine reputation. After an en- 
joyable half-hour inspecting the hos- 
pital, we returned to Corps magnifi- 
cent home. 

The next day he suggested that we 
take a trip to Washington to se^' an- 
other of our classmates who was in 
the Senate. Entering the Senate 
chamber I heard a familiar voice. It 
was Davis Snow making a speech on 



THE TATTLER 



11 



tariff revision. Corp informed me that 
Senator Snow was one of the most in- 
fluential politicians in Washington and 
undoubtedly would be on the next 
presidential ballot. His debating abil- 
ity first shown at Burgy High had won 
him a recognized position in the polit- 
ical circles of the United States. 

On our way back to Philadelphia we 
were chatting about the rest of our 
class. Corp said they were all locat- 
ed in New York with the exception of 
Clary Snow. He had taken up farm- 
ing and now owned a model dairy farm 
in Massachusetts. His herd of pure- 
bred cattle numbered nearly five hun- 
dred. He was one of the leaders in 
dairy circles in the United States. 

The next day we started for New 
York to visit the others. Our first stop 
was at Wall Street. At one of the 
booths a man whom I thought I knew 
was watching the ticker tape. Corp 
said "That's James Coogan whose 
name now replaces J. P. Morgan on 
Wall Street. Our few minutes with 
Jim were so much like old times that 



I was convinced that his prosperity 
had not lessened his interest in his old 
friends. 

Leaving Jim we went up Fifth Ave- 
nue, and stopped in front of a large 
mansion. We were disappointed when 
the servant told us that her mistress 
was out, for Corp had told me that 
Edith Pearl, who was the greatest wo- 
man author of love stories, lived there 
and that she had just received $50,000 
for her latest manuscript. 

From Fifth Avenue we went down 
town to the shopping district where 
Corp stopped in front of a large Fash- 
ion Shoppe. Entering we asked for 
the proprietor who was none other 
than Rena McCloud who had evidently 
been very successful in her business. 

Rena could scarcely talk about her 
business she was so eager to tell us 
about the opening performance of 
Edith's plav "Heart Throbs". Imme- 
diately Corp suggested a theatre party 
which made a pleasant ending to my 
vacation. 

George Waller, '29. 



PROPHECY ON THE 
PROPHET 



Ten years after graduation I was 
back in Burgy to attend the annual 
alumni banquet. Here I found several 
old classmates with whom I was busily 
talking. I heard a voice that sounded 
familiar — "Now I bet you" — I stopped 
short in my conversation. I was try- 
ing to think where I had heard that 
expression so often before. I excused 
myself and started to walk in the di- 
rection from which the voice came. 



There stood a young man, with flaming- 
hair, waving his arms and talking very 
loud. There was quite a crowd gath- 
ered around him and I was anxious to 
hear what was so exciting. I kept 
staring at the gentleman because he 
looked familiar and still he didn't. He 
had the whitest skin imaginable and 
just then I heard a voice saying, "Yes 
after I left high school I decided that 
the first thing to do was to get rid of 



12 



THE TATTLER 



those freckles. I immediately set to 
work to find a really reliable remedy. 
With my extensive knowledge in 
Chemistry it wasn't long before I had 
a solution, and this is the result." And 
he pointed to his face where not a 
freckle could be seen. 

Of course that was George Waller 
and he had managed to get rid of 
those freckles which were so objection- 
able to him because the girls used to 
think they made him look cute and 
George hated to be called "cute". 

As soon as I could get near enough 
to the distinguished gentleman I asked 
for a bottle of his wonderful medicine. 
He began a regular line about 
the wonders this medicine would 
bring about. This sounded so much 
like high school days when George 
used to try to convince the teachers of 
something, that I laughed. At first he 



was much put out at this display of 
rudeness, but in a moment he recog- 
nized me, and we were soon talking 
about his discovery. 

He told me that when he left Burgy 
High he really planned to take a busi- 
ness course but after thinking it over, 
he decided that it was too bad not to 
make use of his vast knowledge of 
Chemistry. So he decided to start at 
once to do something that would bene- 
fit himself at least. The result of his 
experiment not only made him famous 
but it became a source of delight to 
all his befreckled friends. 

I left George with the knowledge 
and joy that at least one in our class 
had made his fortune through his 
knowledge of that much despised sub- 
ject — Chemistry. 

Rena McCloud, '29. 



CLASS WILL 



We the class of 1929, being of minds 
somewhat unsound, and quite forget- 
ful of the things we ought to have 
done, and too often doing the things 
we ought not to have done, but real- 
izing fully that the close of our educa- 
tional life at Williamsburg High School 
is at hand, declare this our last will 
and testament. 

To the faculty, to be equally divided 
among them we leave an annuity of 
appreciation for the instruction re- 
ceived from them. 

We bequeath to the citizens of Wil- 
liamsburg and the School Board, as 
joint heirs our thanks for the generous 
support which they have given our 
public school system. 

To the class of 1930 we give and be- 



queath intact our much anticipated trip 
to Washington or Niagara Falls. Each 
trip is as good as new for we never 
used either. 

To the 1930 Athletic Association we 
bequeath all honors accruing from our 
victories and defeats and also the resi- 
due of our estate. 

To Mr. Merritt, our Superintendent, 
and ever loyal friend, we leave our 
respect and esteem, realizing that he 
i*> already abundantly rich in fairness, 
poise and common sense and that we 
could not further enrich him from our 
meager estate. 

We. the class of 1929, remembering 
the privilege of spending the years of 
our school life in this beautiful build- 



THE TATTLER 



13 



ing leave gratefully to Mrs. Helen E. 
James our good will. 

Edith Pearl bequeaths her poetical 
talents to Barbara Bissell and her 
maidenly charms to Nellie Donahue. 

Alice Dansereau leaves high marks 
and a sterling character to the best 
student in the class of 1930. 

Clary Snow leaves his chair in Miss 
Dunphy's office to Chester Golash 
with the hope that he never has oc- 
casion to use it. 

George Waller leaves his blushes to 
Phyllis Baker and his freckles to Aus- 
tin Snow. 

Evelyn Russell bequeaths her win- 
ning smile to Ruth Pomeroy and her 
coquetry to Gladys Irwin, to be used 
for Raymond Lee's benefit. 

Rena McCloud leaves all her gentle- 
men friends to anyone capable of en- 
tertaining them. 

Walter Kulash has decided not to 
leave his debating ability to any one 
person, but his talent to be divided 
equally among the debaters of 1930. 
His directorship of the Haydenville 



Savings Bank, he leaves uncondition- 
ally to Charlie Heath. 

Davis Snow leaves his catching abil- 
ity to Pat Merritt, providing he'll use 
it in baseball. 

Barbara Bisbee gives all the knowl- 
edge she has attained at the telephone 
exchange to Gordon Nash. 

James Coogan leaves his quiet and 
reserved manner, also his studious and 
athletic ability to Elroy Stanton. 

William Witherell gives all his 
scholastic ability in arguing to Thomas 
Barrus and his athletic ability in pitch- 
ing to Nathaniel Hill. 

To Vernon Warner we leave all old 
papers and marked desks. We hope 
the papers will be used to kindle a 
fire that will warm his heart towards 
the class of '29. 

In testimony thereof we hereunto set 
our hand and seal in the presence of 
these witnesses and declare this to be 
our last will and testament, this' twen- 
ty-fifth day of June in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and twenty- 
nine. Clary Snow 

Class of 1929. 



CLASS GRINDS 



We are the class of '29 

We greet yon here tonight. 

Though we've not always "toed the line", 

We've tried to do what's right. 

II 

Just six boys and maidens five 
Who've worked in Burgy's Hall 
And now to please you I shall strive 
To tell about them all. 

Ill 

Alice Dansereau's many A's 

Will surely help in future days, 

Her Pro Merito honors tell 

Of the years she has worked so well. 



IV 

Barbara Bisbee as you know 
In basketball is not so slow 
.She can run to her patients' aid 
When she a full-fledged nurse is made. 

V 

Rena McCloud's a Plainfield maid, 
And basketball she's sometimes played. 
As Minii then in mystery scene. 
She finally changed to a Boston Bean. 

VI 

Evelyn Russell lives you know 

Down where the Westfield waters flow. 

A smiling girl with curly hair 

And "naughty eyes" so free from care. 



14 



THE TATTLER 



VII 

Now there's another girl to come; 
She's not bright but she's not dumb. 
She's really just an average girl — 
You'll guess her name. It's Edith Pearl. 

VIII 
When Burgy has a prize debate 
You listen all with interest great, 

One debater you'll always know 

It's our president, Davis Snow. 

IX 

Walter Kulash is well-known. 
He's attained his heights alone. 
Pro Merito and paper man 
He's been doing all he can. 

X 

Jimmie Coogan's all that he 
As a Senior, ought to be. 
Athletics find him far from slow, 
And too, he's a Pro Merito. 

XI 

Wiggie Witherell comes from "Hamp", 
At debating he's a "champ". 
He's proved his worth in several ways, 
Alike in Chemistry and plays. 

XII 

Waller comes from Conway town; 
You can't say his hair is brown. 
The youngest of the senior class, 
Yet he could not help but pass. 

XIII 
Last I'll tell of Clary Snow- 
Athletics do his talents show 
Though he does not care for books 
He takes the prize in class for looks. 

XIV 

This is the class of '29. 

You've heard of one and all, 

And for the sake of Auld Lang Syne 

We'll ne'er forget this hall. 

XV 

Our teachers who have done their best 
To guide our steps aright. 
We wish for you a future blest 
With all things fair and bright. 

E. M. Pearl, '29. 



CLASS ROLL 



CLASSICAL COURSE 

* James Coogan 
*Alice Dansereau 
*Walter Kulash 
Davis Snow 



GENERAL COURSE 

Barbara Bisbee 
Rena McCloud 
Edith Pearl 
Evelyn Russell 
Clary Snow 
George Waller 
William Witherell 
*Pro Merito Members 



CLASS NIGHT 

Address of Welcome Davis Snow 

Class History 

(lass Prophecy 

Prophecy on the Prophet 

Rena McCloud 

(lass Will Clary Snow 

(lass (.rinds Edith Pearl 



James Coogan 
George Waller 



GRADUATION NIGHT 

( lass Oration Walter Kulash 

Farewell Address Alice Dansereau 




Jerry of Jericho Road 



On April 19th the musical comedy 
"Jerry of Jericho Road" was given in 
the Town Hall. The setting for this 
operetta was a Western ranch which 
had been turned into a Tourists' Camp. 
Phyllis Baker, in the leading role of 
"Jerry" captivated the audience with 
her clever acting, while William With- 
erell showed his talent as her ar- 
dent lover, John Drayton. The part 
of wealthy Alan O'Day, owner of the 
ranch, was taken by Walter Kulash 
whose ability as an actor had already 
been proven in his role of Kokemo. 
Barbara Bisbee, as Lettice Bank, and 
Nathaniel Hill, as her abused husband, 
furnished a great deal of merriment 
for the audience by their frequent and 
comical misunderstandings. The part 
of Sandy Bank, their daughter was de- 
lightfully taken by Roslyn Brown. Vic- 
tor Greski as an old time Westerner, 
and George Waller as the detective 
villain took their parts well. Gordon 
Nash, as Mr. Bean with his amusing 



"Yaas indeed!" made quite a hit. 
Edith Pearl, as the crisp old maid and 
Rena McCloud as the "gossipy" flap- 
per kept things going. The operetta 
was coached and directed by Miss 
Vivian Williams, the Music Supervisor, 
to whom we owe the credit of its suc- 
cess. 

CHORUS AND DANCERS 
Winnifred Lloyd, Barbara Bissell, Es- 
ther Lupien, Blanche Heath, Gladys 
Irwin, Priscilla Webb, Catherine Otis, 
Ruth Pittsinger, Neva Nash, Charles 
Damon, Russell Clark, Edward Shee- 
han, Charles Heath, James Coogan, 
Philip Cook, Roger Warner, Robert 
Merritt, Thomas Barrus, Ruthven 
Daniels, Alice Dansereau, Evelyn Rus- 
sell, Lois Bisbee. 

MINUET DANCERS 

Alice Lloyd Russell Clark 

Irene Porter Philip Cook 

Doris Sanderson Charles Damon 




CLASS OF 1930 



President: Winnifred .Lloyd 

Vice-President: Robert Merritt 
Secretary: Gordon Nash 

Treasurer: Thomas Barrus 

This class has decreased so greatly 
that nearly every member can hold 
office. But as a class — well, it can't 
be beat ! 

We don't know much of anything 
about Winnie — that is, anything bad 
and what we do know we won't tell. 

As for Barbara we hear a lot, such 
as: "What awful tasting lipstick!" 



Nathaniel Hill still holds the honor 
of being star student and now he has 
come out for baseball. Good spirit, 
eh, what ? 

Gordon Nash is going abroad to 
make good his title of "Count". At 
least, we think he ought to. 

When people talk about Pat's driv- 
ing he always says, "O 'TIS nothing!" 
But we don't believe him. 

We often wonder why Barrus skips 
Math, class so often. His excuse is 
that he has to visit a beauty parlor to 
get his teeth manicured. 




CLASS OF 1931 



We understand that winter is 
Blanche's favorite season, at least, we 
can't help noticing that she's always 
happier with a "Little Snow" near at 
hand. 

Vera, the "Ramona" of the Sopho- 
more class, seems to be equally popu- 
lar with both sexes. 

Roger is our "Longfellow" in more 
ways than one, at least, he has suc- 
ceded in writing quite a few poems 
in English class. 

No wonder Catherine, our basket- 
ball star, isn't afraid to pass by the 
cemetery — with that escort of "merit" 
she always has with her. 

Irene is the shy, little lady of out- 
class, but, of course, we have no way 
of knowing what happens on the 
school bus every day with those gal- 
lant Goshen boys she likes so well. 



We really can't make out whether 
Friscilla is courting Ruthven or Ruth- 
ven courting her, but, at any rate, their 
actions arouse our suspicions. 

We do wish that a j)ostal system 
might be started at W. H. S. so that 
Gladys and Elroy might pass their 
notes with greater ease. 

Is "Cabby" a lover of Julius Caesar ? 
We would say yes ! At least, he 
fought for him very nobly in Ancient 
History class. 

Chester, from all appearances, is 
very fond of English. Maybe he will 
teach it some day, if he ever learns 
the difference between "Sears and 
Roebuck" and "Silas Marner". 

We understand that Nellie is trying 
to reduce. Sincere wishes for her suc- 
cess ! 



18 



THE TATTLER 



We wonder why it is necessary for 
Betty to be so late every morning. Ask 
the truck driver ! 

All the girls of W. H. S. are envious 
of Charlie's curls. What beauty par- 
lor do you frequent Charlie ? 

Bill is so interested in Northamp- 
ton High School just now that we are 
afraid he will leave us and complete 
his course there. 

Pete, our diminutive shortstop, has 
a bad case of freckles. We would sug- 
gest that he get his face "Blanched". 



Roslyn has served us faithfully at 
the piano in chorus all year, and, as 
"Sandy" in the operetta, delighted 
everyone. 

As the "Spice of Life" is to the Lit- 
erary Digest, so is Ray Lee to the clas-. 
of '81. 

Doris seemed very fond of "post- 
office" at Snow's party. We would like 
to ask her. however, what she meant 
by. "second attempt." 

We wonder why Phyllis frequents 
the cemetery. Is it because of "Corpse" 
Phvllis ? 




CLASS OF 1932 



President : Philip Cook 

Vice-President : Alice Lloyd 
Secretary : Charles Damon 
Treasurer: Russell Clark 

Esther Lupien is the star walker 
of the class. She'll get over her shy 
ways is she walks home much more. 

Miss Dunphy will have to think of a 
higher mark than A-f- for Ruth 
Pittsinger. 

No matter how you slice it Lois, it's 
still bologna. So we've been told. 

We can't all be lucky as Charlie Damon 
learning how to play the fiddle. 

Hey ! Gallagher, the heroine of Ivan- 
hoe isn't Ivanhoe. She is Rowena. 



Vic. Greski is our professional golfer. 
He divides his time between school 
and golf. 

Betty Wells tries hard to study but 
she finds it hard trying. 

Alice Lloyd is pretty regular in meet- 
ing the 3 :30 train out of Hayden- 
ville. What's the attraction Alice ? 

Neva Nash is the most powerful look- 
ing member of the freshman class. 

Ruth Pomeroy is the cause of many a 
downfall for Vic. 

Vacation means no rest for Phil Cook, 

he'll alwavs be rushed. 



20 



THE TATTLER 




To A Violet 

Little flower with face of blue 
How dainty and how trim are you! 
Your slender green stem is so strong 
Lifting your dainty head toward the dawn. 

Another summer day has come 
With the rays of the morning sun; 
Another day in your short life, 
Means much pleasure, free from strife. 

At evening when the day is done, 

Your head turns toward the setting sun; 

Another day has gone at last, 

And you rest in the deep cool grass. 

Roger Warner, '31. 

Latin 

I 

It is pretty near to mid-night, 

And the world seems quite at rest. 
Oh ! Caesar was a statesman, 

And he's got me at my best. 
II 
But I am not the only one 

For eight others in our class, 
Are struggling with the same hard thing, 

And wondering if they'll pass. 
Ill 
Oh, Latin is a great old thing, 

And Caesar wrote a story; 
Vergil wrote his Aeneid, too, 

For these things I am sorry. 
IV 
The bells are tolling mid-night, 

I'm leaving with no sorrow; 
I'll rise early all refreshed 

To continue the struggle to-morrow. 

William Merritt, '31. 



To My Country 

America, with your- azure lakes: 
America, how we love you, 
Your fertile fields, and flowered plains, 
The blue sky hung above you! 

America, with your blessed trees, 
America, home of Beauty, 
To keep you so, and help you grow, 
Our joy it is — our duty! 

Gladys Irwin, '31. 



Success 

The path to success is not at all straight, 

The path to success is long. 
In this path there is many a wait, 

Success can't be bought for a song. 

Raymond Lee, '31. 



A Spring Scene 



The sun was shining brightly, 

The flowers were all in bloom. 
The bees were buzzing gaily, 

And song-birds were in tune. 
II 
The trees were standing tall and straight 

The breeze was faint and warm, 
The squirrels peeped from out their nests, 

To hear the robins' song. 
Ill 
The sun went down behind the hills, 

The stars began to peep, 
The moon arose from out the Ea*t, 

And nature went to sleep. 

Roslyn Brown, "31. 



THE TATTLER 



21 



Williamsburg 

Williamsburg is a lovely place 
If one loves old-fashioned grace. 
Lofty rise the ancient elms, 
Little birds sing in their realms. 
In and out wind road and brook. 
As are not found in any book. 
Maple leaves look fresh and green. 
Simple homes and flow'rs are seen, 
Beautiful lawns and shady street, 
Upon the air the bell so sweet 
Resounds afar from the belfry tower, 
Greeting the passers-by each hour. 

Nathaniel B. Hill, '30. 

Ode to the Moon 

Oh moon, beneath thy soft and mellow light 
I lay aside my sorrows and delight. 
The dusky silence and the phantom trees, 
The grayish fields and soft'ning midnight 

breeze, 
Thy light so yellow yet so still 
Which shines alike on brook and hill 
Makes earth seem not like earth at all, 
And fancy finds a fairy hall, 
While elfins down among the grass 
Are planning for a party rash. 
Yes, moon in thy mystic light 
Fairies, goblins, elves delight 
And thou art more than light to me 
I always find new life with thee. 

Edith Pearl, '29. 

A Fortunate Mistake 

As Peggy Day was sitting musing on 
the front porch of their large country 
home in Harristown, her sister, Eliza- 
beth, came rushing out and exclaimed. 

"I think I shall start a new story to- 
day. Mother is feeling much better 
and the doctor says all she needs is 
rest and quiet. I hope the editors will 
accept my story "Springtime" because 
the mortgage falls due this week and 
I expect Mr. Daj'ton anytime now." 

"Your story is very good only the 
editors are too stupid to know it," loy- 
ally replied Peggy. "Forget about the 
mortgage !" 



After Elizabeth went into the sum- 
mer house, Peggy gathered a large 
bouquet of flowers which she brought 
to her mother. 

"Oh! I hope she doesn't find out 
about the story," she said to herself. 
"I did not want to see it lying around 
because it was too fine. I hope the 
new firm that I sent it to will accept 
it." 

"There's a man to see Miss Eliza- 
beth," called Hanna, the maid. "His 
name is Clayton or Dayton, I can't 
remember which." 

"She is very busy, so I'll see him," 
replied Peggy. "It is Mr. Dayton who 
has come to talk about the mortgage. 
If he is still here in about fifteen min- 
utes, bring out some cookies and 
lemonade." Then she went out to 
meet Mr. Dayton. 

Peggy led Mr. Dayton into the rose 
arbor. On the table there she had left 
a few of her paintings and among them 
was one of an old apple tree in full 
bloom. 

With a cry of delight Mr. Dayton 
seized the picture and said, "Who 
painted this ?" 

"Do you like it?" asked Peggy, but 
he did not hear her for he was far 
away in fancy in an orchard where 
there were just such trees and he was 
enhaling once more that sweet fra- 
grance of apple blossoms. 

'Have you any other paintings?" he 
asked finally. 

Peggy showed him some others and, 
selecting three, he said that he wished 
to buy them. At that moment Hanna 
came out with some refreshments. 
After they had eaten, he looked at his 
watch and said, "I have just ten min- 
utes to catch the train, I will send you 
a check for the pictures." 



22 



THE TATTLER 



During the next few days Peggy 
watched the mails, hoping to receive 
her check. On the fourth day she saw 
the mailman put a letter in the box. 
She rushed to it but when she turned 
it over it was addressed to Elizabeth. 

"Here's a letter for you, Elizabeth," 
called Peggy. 

Elizabeth brightened but when she 
saw the sender's address a look of dis- 
appointment came over her face. 

"I was hoping it was from the firm 
where I sent my story but it is from 
another one," she said. As she opened 
the letter a check fell out and then 
Peggy told her that the story had come 
back but she had sent it to a new 
firm. 

The next day while Peggy and Eliza- 
beth were in the garden, a large car 
drove into the yard and a young man 
stepped out. Seeing the girls he 
walked directly to them and Peggy 
recognized the young man as the one 
who had taken the pictures. 

"I couldn't send a check," he ex- 
plained "because I didn't know your 
name." After Peggy told him, he im- 
mediately wrote out a check and gave 
it to her. 

"Did you come about the mort- 
gage?", asked Elizabeth as he sat 
down and began to talk. "You are 
Mr. Dayton, aren't you?" 

"Mortgage ? My ^lame is Clayton 
and I represent th£ publisher's firm 
that accepted you^ story "Spring- 
time". I had come to ask you to sign 
a contract to write ose short story a 
month for our magazine but when I 
saw the paintings I forgot all about 
it." 

Elizabeth gladly signed the con- 
tract and when Mr. Davton came to 



collect the mortgage they were able 
to pay it and their home was safe. 
Alice Dansereau ,'29. 

The Stolen Watch 

John and Arnold Goodwin were the 
only sons of the late Mr. Hanley Good- 
win, a wealthy and influential man 
with a beautiful estate. As their 
mother was dead, they were the sole 
heirs of their father's entire property. 
John, the elder of the two, had a sel- 
fish and repulsive character, and had 
always received just what he wanted. 
But wealth and a high social standing- 
had not spoiled Arnold, who was a 
general favorite, and had many friends 
because he was generous, good-natured 
and full of fun. It was undoubtedly 
because of this, that their father 
slightly favored his younger son in 
his will- 
John's quick jealousy was aroused 
and he was very angry, for this was 
one of the few times in his easy life 
that he had been denied what he 
wished. Although this jealousy in- 
creased as the days went by, he could 
do nothing as he knew that the will 
could not be contested. 

About a month later John discov- 
ered the loss of a beautiful and costly 
watch which his father had left him. 
He authorized a search and a reward 
for the same. All the servants' quar- 
ters were searched but to no avail. 
Finally John declared that it was only 
fair to search Arnold's room. Although 
Arnold was surprised to think that 
John should suspect him, he willingly 
assisted in the hunt. In the presence 
of witnesses, all of whom were John's 
friends except one. a Mr. Burnham. 
John himself found the missing watch 
in the bottom drawer of Arnold's bu- 



THE TATTLER 



23 



reau. This seemed sufficient to prove 
that Arnold had taken this watch. 

Mr. Burnham, Arnold's friend, for- 
bade anyone to touch the box in which 
the watch was kept until he had taken 
the finger prints upon it. John was 
furious at this for some reason which 
the witnesses could not understand, 
but which influenced Mr. Burnham 
even more to carry out his plan. He 
did not think that Arnold, who had al- 
ways seemed to honest and fair, had 
stolen the watch. He then took the 
fingerprints of John and Arnold. To 
the amazement of everyone and the 
great joy of Burnham, the fingerprints 
disclosed the fact that no one had 
touched the box except John himself. 

John finally admitted that he had 
put the watch in Arnold's room so that 
Arnold might be disgraced in the eyes 
of the family and even of the public. 
Again John's character had revealed 
itself and what friends he did have, 
left him. Due to the cleverness of 
Mr. Burnham, Arnold was completely 
exonerated and gained even more 
friends. 

Catherine Otis, '31. 

Music at Midnight 

— ! — ! — ! deep, resonant, three 
chords reverbrated through the halls 
of the Lapraik house. Mr. Lapraik 
was startled into semi-consciousness — 
then the tripping melody. It sank to 
the low notes — then the theme itself. 

Mr. Lapraik suddenly realized what 
this piece was. It was Tarn O'Shan- 
ter. He followed the witches as they 
danced, and Tarn as he rode, followed 
by the ghosts. He recognized in turn 
the staccato beats of the horses feet 
on the bridge, and then the fury of 
the witches deprived of their prey. 



The notes reached their height, and 
then they dropped two octaves note 
by note — ! — ! — ! The last low note 
reechoed through the house. "Well 
done," murmured our listener," but 
who is playing now?" 

Dong! Dong! He listened — it was 
midnight. A slight rustle below told 
the master of the house that his noc- 
turnal visitor had left the piano. "But," 
he said to himself, "Who can it be? 
Chloris played that same piece this 
afternoon when Mac Adam of Craig- 
engillan was here, but not like that." 

Suddenly jumping out of bed he 
went downstairs to investigate. He 
snapped on the lights when, Horror 
of Horrors, he saw Chloris, his one 
and only child lying on the floor, her 
shoulder stained with blood. Blood! 
Quickly dropping to his knees beside 
her, he felt for her heart. ''Thank 
God", he mummured, "She is still alive. 
If she had gone what would I have 
done, with my wife dead, and she, my 
onlv loved one." Rising to his feet, he 
carried her to the lounge and tele- 
phoned for the doctor and the con- 
stable. 

The doctor's report was very satis- 
factory for the father but puzzling to 
Gavin Hamilton, town constable, and 
a man of keen wit. She had been 
stabbed only slightly in the shoulder. 
"Nothing serious," said the doctor. 

"Doctor", said Hamilton, "It rather 
looks as though the one who did it 
meant no harm, doesn't it?" 

"Yes," admitted the doctor. "It 
was only a scratch and evidently was 
meant for no more." 

"What did the young lady have to 
say?" inquired Gavin. 

"Her story briefly was this," said 
Mr. Lapraik. "She heard a squeak 



24 



THE TATTLER 



down stairs and out of foolish curios- 
ity went down to investigate. She saw 
no one, but suddenly a bright light was 
flashed in her face and she felt a hand 
at her mouth. Then she felt some- 
thing sharp at her shoulder and faint- 
ed." 

"One clue there. Well! Well!" said 
Gavin, "A very slim one. Have you, 
by chance missed anything?" 

"No, I haven't." 

"I take it then that you have none 
of your jewelry in the house at the 
present time." 

"Oh, yes," he said, for he was a 
jewelry salesman, "I have six gold 
bracelets which arrived just last night. 
They are right here in my desk." He 
hurried to it and oj:>ened a drawer. It 
was empty ! 

"I thought so," was the constable's 
only reply to the blank look of aston- 
ishment on Lapraik's face. "Come. I 
believe the bracelets have not left the 
house. By the way, what awakened 
you?" 

"That is the queerest part of it all. 
It was some one playing Tarn O'Shan- 
ter," Lapraik replied. 

"You don't say! A rather difficult 
piece, isn't it?" queried the constable 

"I believe it is," said Mr. Lapraik. 

Mr. Hamilton maintained a posi- 
tion of deep thoughtfulness for sevaral 
minutes and then walked to the piano. 
After he had examined it he turned to 
the bench and quickly knelt, as he 
saw that it had a cover. He swung it 
back and looked in. It was empty ex- 
cept for the six gold bracelets and a 
knife, wiped clean of all traces of 
blood or fingerprints. As he swung it 
into place after removing its contents, 
it gave a slight squeak, "Ah," he said 



"I thought as much. Now be so kind 
as to leave me alone for an hour." 

In exactly an hour after Lapraik 
and the doctor withdrew, Hamilton 
appeared and asked them to accom- 
pany him. He went to the hotel where 
Mac Adam was staying and arrested 
the young Scotchman. 

The young musician, not being a 
hardened criminal, confessed. "Yes", 
he said, "I stole the bracelets and 
thought the best place to leave them 
would be in the piano bench. I loved 
Chloris. I knew no beggar, poor as I, 
would be accepted. So. when Mr. La- 
praik showed his daughter the brace- 
lets, I decided to steal them, sell them 
and thus obtain a little money. I did 
not mean to stab her. It was abso- 
lutely necessary to silence her for a 
time. So I tried to stop her mouth 
with my handkerchief. As bad luck 
would have it, I still held my knife. 
My hand slipped and the knife struck 
her shoulder. Since I was afraid she 
would bleed to death, the idea came 
to me, for I was already near the piano 
to play Tarn O'Shanter to awaken her 
father, but — 

'The best-laid plans o'mice and men 
Gang aft a-gley." 

Nathaniel Hill. '30. 

Those Who Work, Win 

"I can't write a short story mother." 
Yerna complained ."please let me go 
over to Beth's, and then when I come 
home I'll be sure to have thought of 
a good one." 

"I would rather have you write the 
story first, and go visiting afterwards," 
her mother replied. 

"But mother, it jn so hot, and any- 
way I just hate to write." Yerna cried 



THE TATTLER 



25 



giving the unoffensive pillow a terrible 
punch. 

"Very well, but remember if you get 
zero in English tomorrow, besides los- 
ing the prize, you have only yourself 
to blame," her mother answered. 

With these words Verna bounded 
out of the house and down the long 
shady street. 

'"Good heavens! Fay! I should think 
you would bake wheeling that baby 
up and down," she stopped to exclaim 
to one of her school chums. 

"Well, it isn't any hotter walking 
than it is sitting in the house and think- 
ing about the heat," Fay exclaimed 
cheerfully. "Besides, taking Betty 
Jane out every night after school 
means two dollars at the end of the 
week ; and that helps a lot when you 
are tempted to complain of the heat. 
By the way, have you written your 
story, Verna ?" 

"No, I haven't, I can't think of a 
thing. I am going over to Beth's and 
we are going to play tennis. Come on 
over, Bob will be there," this was add- 
ed with a sly smile for both Verna and 
Fay liked Beth's brother Bob, a soph- 
omore in college. 

"Sorry, I'd love to, but you see I 
have to write that story. I'm out for 
the ten dollar prize Mr. Wayne offered 
for the best story in the Senior English 
class," and Fay laughed. "Anyway, 
I'll see you tomorrow," she called as 
she wheeled the carriage down the 
street. 

Verna had a fine time all the after- 
noon, never stopping to think of a 
story. Bob walked home with her and 
she enjoyed the sensation of having all 
the girls see her. Poor Fay, who was 
working diligently on the story, saw 
them go by laughing and talking. She 



stopped for a moment in her writing 
and asked herself, "What is the use? 
Verna always gets by and has so much 
fun. Why should I always work?" 

Two days later the teacher an- 
nounced that Fay was the winner of 
the ten dollar jjrize and that she was 
to read her story that night at the en- 
tertainment given by the high school. 

Verna congratulated Fay and told 
her how glad she was. Verna really 
was glad because she was inclined to 
be lazy, and anyway she thought, 
"What is the use of working hard like 
that? What is a little thing like a 
zero in English?" 

But that night, after the entertain- 
ment, everyone told Fay what a fine 
story it was. Then as Verna was on 
her way out of the building she heard 
Bob say — "That was a great story 
Fay, — May I take you home ? My car 
is outside." 

"What do you know about that!" 
Verna sighed sorrowfully. "He only 
walked home with me, and now he is 
driving Fay home in that corking new 
roadster ! Well ! She deserves it and 
this is what I get for being so lazy," 
she added kindly. 

Rena McCloud, '29. 

Adoption Papers 

Selma Harrington sank wearily into 
a deep cushioned arm chair, and 
looked about her. It was difficult for 
the fifteen year old orphan to fully 
realize that everything in that room 
was hers, and that she really did be- 
long to some one, at least, even though 
it was by adoption. Ever since she 
could remember she had lived in an 
orphan asylum in a neighboring city, 
only leaving it for short intervals when 



26 



THE TATTLER 



some stranger had fancied her for a 
helper or companion. 

One day a capable young welfare 
worker. Miss Brent, by name, had visit- 
ed the asylum and asked to see the 
girl. The young woman had felt 
drawn to her at once, and, a few weeks 
later, when she had become Mrs. 
Kent, she had taken Selma to her new 
home with her. 

The first few weeks of Selma's new 
life, seemed to the girl as a pleasant 
dream but at length, the "newness" 
wore off, and she began to grow ac- 
customed to the whirl of events, such 
as — high school and new friends, the 
Girl's Glee Club, scouts, and athletics. 
Selma enjoyed the activities of her 
new life immensely, but more thrilling 
than anything else was the fact that 
she was taking violin lessons, and had 
a lovely violin all her own. The hours 
she spent in practice were the happiest 
of her whole day, and she proved to 
be a very talented pupil, making re- 
markable progress. She loved to coax 
melodies from its threadlike strings, 
many times losing herself in reverie as 
she played. 

But Selma could not help feeling 
lonesome, at times, and she often 
longed to be really related to someone. 
Frequently she imagined that Mrs. 
Kent, whom she had grown to love, 
were her own aunt, and then, coming 
from her reverie, she would feel lone- 
lier than ever. 

* # * # * 

A furious November wind was howl- 
ing about the Kent home, scattering 
withered brown leaves hither and 
thither. Mrs. Kent was out for the 
afternoon, and it would be an hour or 
two before Mr. Kent would appear. 
Selma, after rummaging through a pile 



of old, yellow, dilapidated music had 
found a selection which she was now 
playing. Its plaintive, wistful melody 
captivated her, and she made a lovely 
picture as she stood there in the flick- 
ering shadows of the dim library. Her 
wealth of reddish golden hair was 
coiled about her head, her velvety 
brown eyes nearly closed, and her 
form swayed slightly in time to the 
music. 

Mrs. Kent hastened up the cement 
walk toward her home, eager for its 
cozy protection against the biting Nov- 
ember gales. As she opened the front 
door, a haunting, appealing melody 
reached her ears, and she turned, her 
face suddenly ashen white. Trembling 
violently, she brushed her hand across 
her eyes and stepped toward the lib- 
ra r \ T door. The ravs of the dving em- 
hers of the fire, glistened in Selma's 
tresses, and transformed the thick 
braids into a halo. Then with a shrill, 
piercing little cry Mrs. Kent tottered 
forward. 

"Kathleen!" she cried, "Kathleen!" 
holding the door casing for support. 

The music stopped suddenly, and 
Selma hurried to her. 

"Yes. Auntie, are you ill? Did you 
want me ?" 

"No, child, no." answered the wom- 
an weakly, regaining her self-control, 
"just nervous, and tired a bit. that's 
all. Help Margaret with the supper, 
dear, while I rest." Then softly, "Oh, 
Kathleen !" 

After a very silent meal, Mrs. Kent 
put her hand on Selma's arm beseech- 
ingly. 

"Play that piece for me again. Sel- 
ma," she said kindly, "that piece you 
were playing this afternoon. 

Selma nodded eagerly, glad to re- 



THE TATTLER 



27 



turn to her violin, and newly found 
selection. With Mr. and Mrs. Kent 
stated upon the davenport, Selma be- 
gan. She played beautifully, as she had 
that afternoon — so beautifully that 
Mr. Kent, a natural lover of music 
should have been impressed by it — 
but he was not. He was too upset 
about his wife. There she was, sitting- 
bolt upright, and clutching his arm 
fiercely forming that word, 'Kathleen'. 
At length, the music stopped. 

"Glee Club rehearsal tonight," ven- 
tured Selma, "they need me for the 
violin obligato to one of the songs. Do 
you want me to play any more? If 

"No, child," interrupted Mrs. Kent, 
almost sharply, "Go". 

And Selma did. 

"Now, Ralph," said the woman to 
her husband, "don't look at me like 
that — I'm not crazy. But as Selma 
stood there and played she reminded 
me of my sister, Kathleen, who eloped 
many years ago and never returned. 
Selma is exactly like her, and it is 
queer I never noticed the resemblance 
before. However, I think there is no 
mistake. Selma must be my niece. 
Now I am going to consult Mrs. Dick- 
ens, the matron of the asylum, as soon 
as possible. 

***** 

Mrs. Kent rapped briskly upon Mrs. 
Dickens' office door. Then the ma- 
tron's voice, 

"Yes, come in! Why Charlotte 
Kent! Surely you haven't a complaint 
to make about Selma. You've stood 
her two months—." 

"No complaint to make about Sel- 
ma," interrupted Mrs. Kent sharply, 
"but about the place she came from. 



Listen, Emma Dickens, you refused to 
tell me of her past life when I took 
her nearly two months ago. I said 
nothing then, but now, it is different. 
I demand an explanation of the girls' 
heredity. As her guardian, I should 
know." 

Mrs. Dickens cleared her throat 
helplessly. 

"It is a long story," she began, "told 
to me by her father. It seems Selma's. 
mother had had some trouble at home, 
and had eloped. Her father had or- 
dered her never to return home again, 
and she never did, but went out West 
somewhere with her husband, where 
she died soon after her baby's birth. 
The father then took the child back 
East with him. Unable to find a home 
for her, he brought her to the asylum 
where she was to remain until he was 
better able to support her. But be- 
fore she was a year old, he died. He 
begged me not to tell of the girl's past 
life because the mother did not seem 
to want anyone to know of her baby. 
His name was Wallace Harrington 
and her's Kathleen — why, Brent, I be- 
lieve." 

"Yes," nodded Mrs. Kent shortly, 

"thank you, good-bye." 
***** 

And that night when Selma finally 
crawled into bed, her own mother's 
sweet loving eyes watched her from a 
picture recently hung upon the wall, 
and Selma realized that she was re- 
lated to someone, after all. 

"Why you could burn the adoption 
papers, and I'd still be yours, wouldn't 
I, Auntie?" she whispered, her hand in 
Mrs. Kent's. And that woman, as hap- 
j)y as Selma herself, slowly nodded. 
Phyllis Baker, '31. 



28 



THE TATTLER 



"Perseverance" 

Leah was the oldest of a family of 
eight children, who lived with her par- 
ents in a small village called Brook- 
field. 

All her life Leah had lived at home 
helping to earn money for the family. 
Her father was the village blacksmith 
and his yearly income was not very 
much. Leah's mother was very pa- 
tient through all the trials, which were 
so frequently placed before her, and 
the many cares of the family were a 
great anxiety to her. 

Leah was very fond of books, and 
she longed for an education. However, 
she knew her father's means would not 
take her beyond grammar school. 

Day after day she toiled in the home, 
cleaning, washing and baking. She 
often wished she had an opportunity 
as other girls had. Leah liked child- 
ren very much and she longed to be a 
teacher one day, but she knew this was 
useless without a High School educa- 
tion. 

On Leah's fourteenth birthday a let- 
ter came in the mail from her Aunt 
Marie, who lived in Ohio. With trem- 
bling fingers she opened the letter. As 
she read its contents a look of delight 
came over her face. 

Running eagerly into the room where 
her mother was sewing, she showed 
the letter to her fond parent. Toge- 
ther they read it again and again for 
they could not believe it was true. 

Aunt Marie wanted Leah to come 
and live with her as she was growing- 
old and did not wish to live alone. 
She also said, "As Leah is very much 
interested in school and books, I should 
be very much pleased to put her 
through High School, here in Dayton." 
Leah was overjoyed with the plan, 



as were her parents, who thought it 

was a great opportunity for their 

daughter. Great preparations were 

made for the trip to Ohio, and it was 

an excited girl who boarded the train 

for her Aunt's home a week later. 
***** 

Four years had passed since Leah 
came to Ohio. She had graduated with 
honors from High School, and now 
the question was "Where shall I go 
next?" Her father back in the East 
did not need her help now, but her 
aunt was very old, and her health was 
failing, so Leah stayed and helped her 
aunt until her death in August. 

Aunt Marie left Leah a large sum 
of money to do with as she wished. In 
September she entered Normal School, 
thus realizing her greatest ambition. 
Ruth Pittsinger, '32. 

Un Soir a Paris 

"Where do we dine this evening, my 
good Edouard? The months when 
the rich and most generous Americans 
are not here are not so good for our 
digestion sometimes, yes?" remarked 
Comte de Lebretagne, while strolling 
along the Rue Bonaparte. 

"Well. I think something worth- 
while awaits us at the Hotel du 

Louis, the clerk, tells me that J. M. 
Stanley and his daughter Jane arrived 
there last night — I've heard of her 
before — a good catch ! Let us hasten 
— She may come down to dinner alone 
because her father is not well — " 

"Here we are and here she comes — 
what luck. Tiens ! — One moment 
Comte! Ah, Miss Jane Stanley? — 
Allow me — my friend Comte de Lebra- 
tagne — Mis>. Stanley of Georgia. Ah. 
but you know me?" as the i>irl inter- 
rupted. "No? alas, you must have for- 



THE TATTLER 



29 



gotten ! I am Gordon Davenport's 
most intimate friend, Edouard Braise. 
Ah, what pleasures we experience to- 
gether upon his frequent visits — And 
uh uh — " as she again interrupt- 
ed this stream of fluency — "And al- 
ways he speaks of the Miss Jane Stan- 
ley, and did I not have the great hon- 
or of dancing with you last season? 
Ah-h ? — Of course you must dine with 
us! Right over here — Garcon!" 

And as charming, suave but volu- 
able Edouard Braise rapidly checked 
off the order, the handsome Comte 
captured the excited but somewhat be- 
wildered Miss Stanley in brilliant con- 
versation concerning his business con- 
nections with her father and other as- 
sociates. 
"Ah now," continued Edouard, "once 



more 



your father, he is well?' 



Good !" to her vague assent. 

Jane Stanley made a pretense of 
eating and, bewildered, looked from 
one Frenchman to the other, who were 
now giving all their attention to the 
soup; now the salad; now the meat — . 

"Why, just as if they expected it to 
vanish the next moment!!' Jane re- 
called later. 

"Queer — joining them in a meal like 
this. I do not remember having met 
them before, but Ell speak to Dad; 
perhaps he knew them." 

"Well, anyway it was awfully in- 
triguing to be dining with two charm- 
ing Frenchmen, and one of them a 
Comte ! Something to tell the girls 
back home," she mused, "even though 
M. Braise was rather dashing in his 
ways — including table manners" — suc- 
ceeding in smothering a giggle. 

Edouard jjaused in his attack on the 
Bastille — or rather pie — to catch a 
signal from the garcon. 



"Ah, pardon ! — one moment, please" 
— A few brief and rapidly exchanged 
sentences with the waiter, and he 
came back to the table with a con- 
cerned frown on his face. 

"I am very sorry, but the bad news 
must be said — Comte, that expected 
call arrived and we must at once de- 
part. What an inconvenience ! Miss 
Stanley, a thousand apologies but the 
Comte and I are called on a business 
errand, and we must take a reluctant 
leave of your charming person." 

And bending over her hand, they 
each murmured — "A most enjoyable 
evening, au revoir, mademoiselle." 

Jane's doubting eyes followed their 
rapidly disappearing backs, when the 
garcon respectfully murmured, "Voici 
la note, mademoiselle!" 

We see M. Braise and Comte de Le- 
bretagne again in the street, and do 
we hear the Compte conclude — "Yes, 
a most enjoyable meal, n'est-ce pas?" 
And Edouard drolly adds, "Oh, well, 
my good friend, one must eat — and ces 
Americains — si genereux!" 

W. E. Lloyd, '30. 

Too Late 

The massive prison gates slowly 
closed. This time the man was gazing 
on the world while ten years ago he 
had looked upon the narrowness of 
the prison and the gloom of long- 
work and suffering. Ten years had 
made him hard, skeptical and full of 
thirst for revenge. This was not 
strange for he had been }:>laced in jail 
for a minor offense ; partly because the 
state had given him a young inexperi- 
enced lawyer to defend him, but most- 
ly because the judge had always had 
a grudge against his family. During 



30 



THE TATTLER 



those years in jail he had come in 

contact with many professionals in 

crime. He had learned the tricks of 

every trade, and how and when to use 

them. 

Now he stood sensing again that 

feeling of freedom; he remembered all 

his past grievances, his many plans 

while he was toiling neath the burning 

sun and he sneered. "Old world! you 

will wake up — too late," he said. 
***** 

About a week later anyone picking 
up a newspaper would have seen news 
of various robberies. Detectives had 
been working on these cases and they 
were all attributed to a single individ- 
ual. In each case, no clue was found 
except a scrap of paper with the auto- 
graph "T. Late" hurriedly scribbled 
thereon. After his work had been ac- 
complished the criminal just disap- 
peared and the detectives always ar- 
rived — too late. 

***** 

Just before sunset, there appeared 
from a clump of trees on a solitary 
country road, a man's figure. He 
went rather stealthily for he had hopes 
of a rich haul that night. A summer 
residence was to be left unguarded and 
the famous Wentworth diamonds were 
his for the taking. He was getting the 
lay of the land while he could see, but 
he always waited till evening for the 
deed. After he had secured the neces- 
sary information, he started back. 
Suddenly a wonderful glow illumined 
the earth. He looked up, and gazed in 
awe and wonder, for the sun in setting 
had glorified the earth. His eyes be- 
held such beauty in color and cloud 
formation that it seemed as though the 
gates of heaven had opened before his 
vision. Soon it seemed as though he 



was looking at another sunset with his 
mother and he heard her sweet voice 
say. "Always remember, dear, that a 
sunset is God's promise for better 
times." 

"Better times," he repeated bitterly, 
"If they come they will come as all 
things come — too late." Yet his newly 
awakened soul cried out, "Is it too 
late?" "Yes it is!" the man said 
harshly and walked on, but he realized 
in his heart that it was not too 
late. He might yet live a good and 
true life, might become a loyal and 
faithful citizen. And somehow the 
swaying branches of the stately trees 
whispered persuasion to him, the 
breezes sighed a soft encouragement, 
and all nature entreated him. 

So he went back to his own hiding 
place where the results of the robberies 
were kept. It was all there and that 
same night he returned the stolen 
goods to their respective owners. It 
was an all-night job and when the 
owners found their property returned 
and had notified the detectives, they 
arrived on the scene — too late. 

Thus through nature and his mother 
a hardened criminal was changed sud- 
denly into a self-respecting citizen, be- 
loved by all his countrymen for his 
good deeds. 

Edith Pearl, '29. 

Only a Girl 

"Mother, isn't it a pity that Cousin 
Louise is coming just at this time; she 
will be such a bother to me. How- 
can 1 play with a girl ? Why, she will 
bring a wax-doll with her. 1 suppose !" 

So spoke Billie Herman, who being 
the only child of a widowed mother, 
had been consulted in everything more 



THE TATTLER 



31 



than was good for him, with the result 
that lie was rather a selfish lad who 
could not bear to have any plan of his 
own overturned for the sake of others. 

"It is rather a pity,'' replied his 
mother kindly, "if you think that hav- 
ing Louise in the house will spoil your 
holidays. Louise, although a city-bred 
girl can play at many games which you 
like well enough. We ought to be 
kind you know, Billie, and give up 
our plans sometimes for the sake of 
others. Don't you think so, my dear?" 

"Well, I don't know," grumbled Bil- 
lie. "I don't understand girls' ways; 
they cry for the least thing, and they 
can't cross a brook without tumbling 
into it, and as for climbing over a 
fence! Oh, dear! How thankful I am 
that I am not a girl!" 

But his mother only laughed. "Well 
Billie," she said, "I know that *ome 
girls are troublesome, but I believe 
Louise is a very amiable girl, and I 
feel certain that you will like her." 

But Billie's face still wore a some- 
what displeased expression. "Mother," 
he said, "I wish you had not called 
her an amiable girl. I just hate the 
idea, but I suppose it can't be helped 
now. I declare, there she comes!" 

"Already?" said his mother, "and I 
intended to meet her at the station. 
She must have come on an earlier 
train. Come, Billie ! Help her out of 
the cab." 

"Of course," grumbled Billie. "Help 
her out, indeed ! Has she no legs of 
her own? If she had been a boy she 
would have been on the doorstep in 
a twinkling. However, here goes," and 
with a resigned look he followed his 
mother to the hall door. 

After a few pleasant days, every- 
thing went well with Billie and Louise 



who seemed to be, (as people say) 
"Just made for each other." Now 
there came a sudden change which 
only showed Louise in a still more 
amiable light. Billie, who had climbed 
one day to an owl's nest, missed his 
footing, fell to the ground and was 
carried home with a badly fractured, 
leg. While he was home with this 
fractured leg Louise read stories to 
him, encouraged him, and told him that 
his leg would soon be well again. 

When his health was quite restored 
and when Louise was about to leave 
her aunt's pretty, country-home, and 
return to the noisy, crowded city, Bil- 
lie went with her to the railway sta- 
tion. In his heart there was something 
heavy which seemed to weigh it 
down. Billie never before experienced 
such a feeling! "Isn't it strange," he 
thought, "to feel like this when part- 
ing with only a girl !" 

« 

"Dear cousin," he said, "How I shall 

miss you! How kind you have been! 
I heard Mother ask you to come back 
to see us again, Do come, Louise!" 

Then Louise smiled, "Won't I be 
glad to come!" she said, "I do love 
the country, and auntie, and you too, 
Billie, tho' you are — 'only a boy'." 

Alice Lloyd, "62. 

Fairyland 

It was winter time and the streets of 
London were dark and dreary. A lit- 
tle girl was walking down the street. 
Her clothes were ragged and she had 
no shoes. She was cold and as she 
passed by the houses she wished that 
she lived in one of them which looked 
so cozy and warm inside. People pass- 
ing by didn't notice her. They were 
hurrying home to their sujaper and 
were going to spend a delightful even- 



32 



THE TATTLER 



in» there. A few days ago this little 
girl had a mother and, although they 
were very poor they were happy. But 
one morning the mother didn't answer 
the little girl's call. The cruel land- 
lady told her harshly that she was 
dead. The little girl knew that she 
couldn't live there any more, so thai 
was why she was wandering along the 
street. It was growing colder and she 
began to hurry. At the end of the 
street was a shed where some workmen 
kept their tools. The little girl thought 
that she would spend the night there. 

She soon fell fast .asleep and had a 
wonderful dream of Fairyland. A 
beautiful woman was bending over 
her. The little girl told her sad story. 
The woman listened and then said. 

"Darling, don't you know me? I 
am your mother. I am so glad you 
have come to live with me again." 

The little girl recognized her mother 
and thought she was more beautiful 
than ever before. The mother told 
her little girl what a wonderful place 
it was, that it was always warm, with 
plenty to eat, and no sorrows. There 
were many other little children play- 
ing around and the little girl soon 
made friends with them. The next 
morning the men came to the shed to 
get their tools and found the little 
girl lying there. They were rough 
workmen but were awed at the smile 
on her face. 

Blanche Heath, '31. 

Origin of the Constitution 

All down through the ages man's 
first desire has been for freedom. This 
desire received its first real satisfaction 
in the Athenian democracy. There 
through the "Golden Age of Pericles" 
it flourished in its fullest bloom. Years 



rolled on. Rome rose and fell. Coun- 
try after country came to the fore and 
then perished as Rome had perished. 
And as we continue to turn the pages 
of history we see England in all her 
glory. 

Here, roughly speaking, the Consti- 
tutional form of government may be 
said to have had its first use, when the 
barons of England met king John at 
Runnymede, in an armed parley which 
would have ended in open rebellion 
had their desires not been gratified. 
These, our forefathers, were not de- 
manding new laws or better, but a 
righteous and consistent administra- 
tion of laws which they regarded as 
already established — their immemorial 
birthright as English men. 

We now come to the period in his- 
tory when there were thirteen strug- 
gling colonies on the East Coast of 
North America. Thirteen separate 
colonies, the largest of which had but 
half a million people. All of these 
owed allegiance to the British Crown: 
all except Connecticut and Rhode Is- 
land received their governors from 
England. But practically each colony 
was a self governing Commonwealth 
left to manage its own affairs with 
scarcely any interference from home. 

When the oppressive measures of 
the home government roused the col- 
onies, they naturally sought to organ- 
ize their resistance in common. Sing 
ly they would have been an easy prey 
for it was long doubtful whether even 
in combination they could stand 
against regular armies. Therefore 
delegates from twelve states met at 
Philadelphia in 1771 and called them- 
selves the Continental Congress. 

In 1776 a second Congress declared 
the independence of the Colonies and 



THE TATTLER 



33 



framed the Articles of Confederation. 

But this form of government was 
destined to fall. It was built upon too 
weak a foundation. It was formed to 
carry the colonies through the war 
with England and it accomplished its 
purpose. But through those years, 
called by some the most critical in 
our history, after Washington had 
safely guided us through the war with 
England, its incompetence was sadly 
felt. 

Sad experience of their internal dif- 
ficulties and of the contempt with 
which foreign governments treated 
them, at last produced a feeling that 
some firmer and close union was need- 
ed. 

As a result of this a convention of 
delegates from five states met at An- 
napolis, Maryland. It drew up a re- 
port which condemned the existing 
state of things, declared that reforms 
were necessary and suggested a fur- 
ther general convention in the follow- 
ing year. 

Congress to whom the report had 
been submitted, approved of this and 
recommended the states to send dele- 
gates to a convention which should re- 
vise the Articles of Confederation. 

The convention thus summoned 
met at Philadelphia on the 14th of 
May 1787, and chose George Wash- 
ington to preside. Delegates attended 
from every state except Rhode Island, 
and among these delegates were to be 
found the best intellect and the ripest 
political experience the United States 
then continued. 

The instructions which they had re- 
ceived limited their authority, but with 
admirable boldness the majority ulti- 
mately decided to prepare a wholly 
new constitution to be considered and 



ratified not by Congress or the state 
legislatures but by the people of the 
United States. 

This famous assembly which con- 
sisted of fifty-five delegates, sat near- 
ly five months and expended upon it 
an amount of labor and thought 
commensurate with the magnitude of 
the task and the sjDlendor of the re- 
sult. 

It is hard today even for Ameri- 
cans to realize how enormous those 
difficulties were. The convention had 
not only to create a new constitution 
on the most slender basis of preexist- 
ing national institutions, but it had 
in so doing to respect the fears and 
jealousies and apparently irreconcil- 
able interests of thirteen separate com- 
monwealths. Well might Hamilton 
say: "The establishment of a constitu- 
tion, in times of profound peace, by 
the voluntarv consent of a whole peo- 
pie, is a prodigy to the completion of 
which I look forward with trembling 
anxiety", and well might he quote the 
words of David Hume: "To balance a 
large state or society whether monar- 
chic or republican, on general laws, is 
a work of so great difficulty that no 
human genius however comprehensive 
is able by the mere dint of reason and 
reflection to effect it. The judgments 
of many must unite in the task; ex- 
perience must guide their labor ; time 
must bring it to perfection ; and the 
feeling of inconveniences must correct 
the mistakes which they inevitably 
fall into in their first trials and ex- 
periments." 

There were elements of unity in the 
colonies, there were also elements of 
diversity. All spoke the same langu- 
age. All but a few belonged to the 
same race. All managed their affairs 



34 



THE TATTLER 



by elective legislatures attached to 
local self government, and all were 
animated by a common pride in their 
successful resistance to England. 

On the other hand, the wealth of 
some colonies consisted in slaves, of 
others in shipping; while in others 
there was a population of small farm- 
ers characteristically attached to old 
habits. 

But .while these diversities and jeal- 
ousies made union difficult, two dan- 
gers were absent which have beset the 
framers of constitutions for other na- 
tions. There were no reactionary con- 
spirators to be feared, for every one 
prized liberty and equalitv. There 
were no questions between classes, no 
animosities against rank and wealth. 

The Constitution was and remains 
what its authors styled it, eminently 
an instrument of compromises ; it is 
perhaps the most successful instance 
in history of what a judicious spirit 
of compromise may effect. 

There was struggle everywhere over 
the adoption of the constitution, a 
struggle presaging the birth of the 
great parties that for many years di- 
vided the American people. The 
chief source of hostility was the belief 
that a strong central government en- 
dangered both the rights of the states 
and the liberties of the individual 
citizen. Freedom, it was declared. 
would perish, freedom rescued from 
George III would perish at the hands 
of her own children. Feeling was 
very bitter and in some states, notably 
New York and Massachusetts, the ma- 
jorities were dangerously narrow. But 



eventually every state ratified it and 
on Jan. 7. 1789, who was more deserv- 
ing to become the father of our coun- 
try and our first president, than George 
Washington ? 

The Constitution of 1789 deserves 
the veneration with which the Ameri- 
cans have been accustomed to regard 
it. It is true that many criticisms have 
been passed on its arrangement and 
upon the artificial character of some of 
the institutions it creates. It has been 
charged with having contained the 
germ of the Civil War, though that 
aerm took seventy vears to come to 
maturity. Yet. after all deductions. 
it ranks above every other written con- 
stitution, for the intrinsic excellence of 
its scheme, its adaptation to the cir- 
cumstances of the people, the simpli- 
city, brevity and precision of its lan- 
guage, its judicious mixture of definite- 
ness in principle with elasticity in de- 
tails. 

The American Constitution is no ex 
ception to the rule that everything 
which has power to win the obedience 
and respect of men must have its roots 
deep in the past and that the more 
slowly every institution has grown so 
much the more enduring is it likely to 
prove. There is little in this Consti- 
tution that is absolutely new. There 
is much as old as Magna Charta. 

The Constitution of the United 
States has lasted for over a century 
and probably if we could gaze far in- 
to the dim future, we would see it still 
standing; still supported by those prin- 
ciples upon which it was formed. 

D. W. Snow. '29. 




Debating Society 



Officers 



President 

Vice-President 

Sec.-Treas. 



Davis Snow '29 
Walter Kulash '29 
James Coogan '29 



The debating- society had another 
successful year. From the first pre- 
liminary in September until its last in- 
terscholastic in April a keen interest 
was sustained in debating. 

The September debate was on the 
subject, "Resolved, that the Philip- 
pines should be granted immediate in- 
dependence." This was won by Wil- 
liam Witherell, with Clary Snow as sec- 
ond. 

The subject of the October debate 
was, "Resolved, that military training 
should be compulsory in our schools 
and colleges." Thomas Barrus won 
first place and Winnifred Lloyd second. 

The third and last preliminary de- 
bate was held in November. The sub- 
ject was, "Resolved that United States 



should protect by armed force, if 
necessary, the property of her citizens 
abroad." This was won by Nathaniel 
Hill, with Gordon Nash second. 

The participants of the prize debate 
were Winnifred Lloyd, Walter Kulash 
and Davis Snow who upheld the affirm- 
ative, and William Witherell, Nathan- 
iel Hill and Thomas Barrus who up- 
held the negative. The question was, 
"Resolved, that the government should 
own and oj)erate our water power pro- 
jects." The affirmative won. The 
first prize of $5 was won by Walter 
Kulash. This prize was contributed 
by the Alumni Association in order to 
further this good work among the stu- 
dents; Winnifred Lloyd received hon- 
orable mention. 

In our first interscholastic debate 
this year, Hopkins Academy was de- 
feated by our team comprised of Winn- 
ifred Lloyd, William Witherell and 
Nathaniel Hill, who upheld the affirma- 



36 THE TATTLER 

the of the question, "Resolved, that The Debating Society wishes to 
the jury system should be abolished." thank Mrs. Warner for continuance of 
Our other interscholastic debate was her wonderful work in promoting very 
with Amherst. The subject was, "Re- successful intrascholastic and inter- 
solved that the Philippine Islands scholastic debates. The Society also 
should be given their independence." wishes to thank all those who in any 
Our team composed of Davis Snow, way contributed to the success of the 
Thomas Barms and Walter Kulash teams. 
won after a close battle. 



"SONG HITS" 

Sonny Bov George Waller Over There Davis Snow 

Good News Graduation Button Up Your Overcoat 

I'll Get By Clary Snow James Coogan 

Sweethearts on Parade Too Many Parties and Too Many Pals 

Rena McCloud and William Witherell Barbara Bissell 

Does She? I'll Say She Does Her Beaus are Qnly Rainbeaus 

Blanche Heath AHce Dansereau 

Weary River Thomas Barm* . 

Pal O Mine Barbara Bisbee 

You Should See My Neighbor's Daugh- . ., „ 

lo-gether \\ innie and D. D. 



ter Robert Merritt 

How about Me? Ruthven Daniels 

You Were Meant for Me 

Phvllis Baker 



That Certain Party Gordon Nash 

Phyllis is My Only Joy 

"Corp" Kulash 

I Can't Give You Anything But Love 
High Up on the Hill-top ^ , T 

& ^ r Ravmond Lee 

Nathaniel Hill 

Three O'clock in the Morning 
Kiss Me Again Priscilla Webb Charlie Heath 

Was it a Dream? Evelyn Russell , F&n Down ^ Go Boom 

I'm All Alone Roslyn Brown Edith Pearl 

All by Myself in the Moonlight When Shall We Meet Again 

Gladys Irwin Winnifred Lloyd 







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athletic: 



Basketball 

The sound of a whistle was heard, 
and the basketball season had opened. 
Burgy was the victor in eight of the 
sixteen games played. Victories over 
Belchertown (2), Huntington (2), 
Charlemont (2), Smith School (1) 
and Sanderson Academy (1) made a 
total of eight. Williamsburg played 
several teams out of its class. In those 
games, the M. A. C. Freshmen, Smith 
Academy, St. Michaels, Clarke School 
were the victors. Several times during 
the season, the squad was hard hit by 
sickness. However, a fighting spirit 
and loyalty to their coach saved Burgy 
from any disastrous defeats. 

The team closed the season with a 
fast finish by a 50-20 score over Bel- 
chertown. 



>cores 



Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 

Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 
Will 



amsburg 14, St. Michaels 2 8 
amsburg 13, Easthampton 40 
amsburg 23, Ashfield 17 
amsburg 22, Smith School 17 
amsburg 28, Belchertown 16 
amsburg 16, Clarke Cchool 35 
amsburg 20, Smith School 27 
amsburg 33, Huntington 16 
amsburg 12, M.A.C. Freshmen 17 
amsburg, 17, Smith Academy 28 
amsburg 16, St. Michaels 29 
amsburg 28, Huntington 14 
amsburg 50, Belchertown 20 
amsburg 18, Ashfield 33 
amsburg 40, Charlemont 25 
amsburg 33, Charlemont 13 




Baseball 

After weeks of waiting, the excess 
moisture disappeared from the dia- 
mond, and Burgy entered an enjoyable 
baseball season. The outstanding vic- 
tory was a whitewash over Burgy's 
rival, Ashfield, 5-0. Two games have 
been lost this year in extra innings. 
While the season is yet incomplete, a 
fine spirit of enthusiasm prevails 
throughout the squad, due in no small 
measure to the keen interest and fine 
coaching of Mr. Wilder. 

Scores 

Smith School 11. Williamsburg 4 
Belchertown 5, Williamsburg 3 
Ashfield 0, Williamsburg 5 
Belchertown 6, Williamsburg 18 
South Hadley 8, Williamsburg 7 
So. Hadley 11, Williamsburg 10, 10 in. 
Charlemont 13, Williamsburg 11 
Charlemont 16, Williamsburg 15, 10 in. 



Girls' Basketball 

"Who plays in the preliminary?" 
asked an interested fan. In a second, 
the floor was a scene of a girls' bask- 
etball game. The Burgy girls under 
the direction of Miss Burke had opened 
a successful season. Victories over 
Sanderson Academy (1), Huntington 
(2). and Cummington (1) gave the 
Burgy girls a winning percentage. A 
loss to Sanderson Academy, and two 
losses to Charlemont completed the 
season. 



Williamsburg 9, Charlemont 10 
Williamsburg 26, Ashfield 13 
Williamsburg 8, Ashfield 10 
Williamsburg 35, Cummington 13 
Williamsburg 16, Huntington 13 
Williamsburg 26, Huntington 17 
Williamsburg 8, Charlemont 18 



THE TATTLER 



39 



Alumni Notes 



Class of '28 

Evelyn Atherton — College House in 
Northampton. 

Clara Atherton — College House in 
Northampton. 

Leroy Weeks — State Roadman. 

Mildred Roberge — At home. 

Pauline Webb — Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 

Walter Utley — Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

Mary Black — Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

Logia Kmit — Northampton Commer- 
cial College. 

Elizabeth Pennington — B u r n h a ni 
School, Northampton. 

Henry Drake — McCallum's Hosiery. 

Olive Rhoades — Westfield Normal 
School. 



Colleges 

Robert Tetro '27 — Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 

Richard Merritt '27 — Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

Alma Graves '24 — Cooley Dickinson 
Hospital. 

Helen Merritt '27 — Smith College. 



Graduates, June, 1929 

Francis Manwell '24 — from Amherst 
College. 

Marriages 

Milton Howes '20 to Gertrude Gloyd 

ex-'28. 

Lyndal H. Cranson '23 to Robert C. 
Dennison, Colrain. 

Hazel Holden '25 to Roger Bennett, 
Southbridge. 

Engagements 

Mildred Roberge '28 to Lester Damon. 
Wilfred Graves '21 to Marion Heiller. 

Positions 

Hazel Hathaway '27 — King's Insur- 
ance Office. 
Helen Tetro '23 — Bank at Bristol, Ct. 

Leslie Packard '27 — M. A. C. Office, 
Northampton. 

Bruce Nash '25 — Troy, N. Y. 

Wilbur Purrington '25 — Head of In- 
vestment Dept., Hampshire County 
Trust. 

Births 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tower (Car- 
rol Clark '25) a girl Harriet Lucille. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Milton Howes (Mit 
Howes '26) a girl Thelma Marion. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles Shelnut (El- 
vera Schuler '29) a boy Richard 
Edward. 



40 



THE TATTLER 



Class Grinds 



Pat Merritt had declined the nomin- 
ation for President of the Debating 
Society. When he was nominated for 
Vice-President. Priscilla Webb said: 
"He's reclined once!" 



Mr. Wilder: Put that candy up! 
"D. D." Pearl: Oh ! It's going down. 



Miss Williams: I can't hear you 
singing. 

— — : Come up closer! (affection- 
ately). 



Miss Williams: I want to have you 
understsand that I don't want to be 
picked up again ! 



Mrs. Warner (to Corp. who is think- 
ing of other things) : You could at 
least pay attention even if you are go- 
ing to be leading lady ! 



Miss Burke (in English) : Johnson 
would often look at the church steeple 
and not be able to tell the time. 

Corp: That's nothing I do that lots 
o'times. 



Teacher: It will be four o'clock in 
just five minutes. 

Neva Nash : What time is it now ? 



Mr. Wilder: What does veal come 
from ? 

Alice Llovd : Lamb. 



Barrus (dropping acid bottle) : Well 
it was empty anyway ! 

Wiggie (absently) : Was there any- 
thing in it ? 



Miss Dunphy (in Caesar class) : 
Austin, what is a panic? 

"Pete" (who has been out the night 
before) : It's a result of happiness. 



Mr. Wilder: Why Barrus, that ex- 
ample can't be done ! 

Earrus: I know it can't but if it 
could it would be done like that ! 



Mrs. Warner: Tell about Patrick 
Henry. 

Earbara Eisbee : Is that the one they 
call St. Patrick? 



Witherell to Miss Burke: Are you 
related to Edmund Burke ? 

Miss Burke: Oh yes, I'm his grand- 
daughter ! 

Witherell: I didn't think you were 
so old as that. 



(Talking about five-toed animals in 
zoology class) Rena: How many toes 
has a horse ? 



Mr. Wilder: Witherell, what is the 
valence of potassium ? 

Witherell (counting upon his fing- 
gers) : Three ! 

Mr. Wilder: No potassium has a val- 
ence of one. 

Witherel (very much excited) : You 
are mistaken ! Potassium has the val- 
ence of one and potassium — three! 



Miss Burke:: What came of the 
friendship between George Elliot and 
Mr. Tewes? 

Winnie Lloyd : Well, she married 
after he died. 



COLODNY CLOTHING CO. 



Northampton's Newest and Livest Clothing Store 



Main St., Northampton 



Graduation Blue Serge Suits and White Flannels, Complete $22.50 



The Music House 



O. S. P. INC. 



READY TO SERVE YOU WITH A COMPLETE LINE OF MUSIC 



Pianos — Radios — Victrolas 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



PHONE 96 

CITV TAXI SERATCE 

Taxi Rate: To or from Williamsburg, $4.00 
SEDANS — BUSES — "DRIVURSELF" CARS 

DRAPER HOTEL BLDG. NORTHAMPTON 



WE DO FIRST-CLASS 

CLEANING AND DYEING 

One of our specialties is cleaning and repairing 

We Call For and Deliver 

Stanley Paddock 

MAIN STREET FLORENCE, MASS. 



The Newest in Footwear for the Younger Set 



Fleming's Boot Shop 



189 MAIN STREET NORTHAMPTON". MASS 



When in want of the best 
meats visit our store 

Sidney F. Packard 

MEATS AND PROVISIONS 

WILLIAMSBURG, MASS 



NORTHAMPTON COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 

"The School of Thoroughness" 
76 PLEASANT STREET 
NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

WM. J. SHEEHAN & CO. 

HAYDENVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 

Socony Oil Station 

F. E. SANDERSON, Mgr. 

SOCONY PRODUCTS LIGHT LUNCHES, ICE CREAM 

CONFECTIONARY CIGARS, CIGARETTES SODAS 

HOME COOKED FOOD 

WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 

CHILSON'S AUTO TOP SHOP 

W. LEROY CHILSON 

"SIX DISTINCTIVE DEPARTMENTS" 

Upholstered Furniture Slip Covers and Cushions, Auto Tops and Upholstery 

Harness Shop Automobilt Plate Glass Upholstered Chair Seats 

34 CENTER ST. NORTHAMPTON, MASS. TEL. 1822 



Allison Spence 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

100 MAIN ST., NORTHAMPTON 
CLASS PHOTOGRAPHER TO BURGY HIGH FOR TEX YEARS 

"Come Again Burgy!" 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Burke & Burdeau 



Williamsburg, Massachusetts 



Insurance 

ACCIDENT, AUTOMOBILE, BURGLARY, FIRE AND LIFE 

Plans and Estimates gladly given 

FRANKLIN KING, Jr. 

Tel. 54-4 Insurance and Real Estate Havdenville, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 




NORTHAMPTON, 



MASS. 



HILL BROS. 



KNICKERNICK UNDERWEAR 



The Kind That Fits 



118 Main Street 
NORTHAMPTON, 



MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Frank A. Brandle 



College Pharmacy 



NORTHAMPTON, 



MASS. 



Baseball 



BASEBALL AND TENNIS GOODS 



Spalding & Draper — Maynard 



T. A. PURSEGLOVE 



TRAVELERS' REST 



DINNER PARTIES A SPECIALTY 



Under New Management 



Williamsburg, 



Ms 



Herbert Witherell 

CUSTOM TAILOR 
Domestic and Imported Woolens 

Suits and Overcoats made to order 



Tel. 23-12 



Williamsburg, Mass. 



Phone 115 , 

Williamsburg Garage 

C. K. Hathaway 
Filling Station Auto Repairing 

lee Cream, Candy, Cigars 
WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 



A. Solty's 



MEAT, GROCERIES, VEGETABLES 



TEL. 113-5 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



Williamsburg Grocery 



HAYDENVILLE, 



MASS. 



Northampton Y. M. C. A. 

INVITES YOU TO OUT-OF-TOWN 
MEMBERSHIPS 



One-Half Rate 
FULL MEMBERSHIP 

JOIN TO-DAY 

COMPLIMENTS OF 



$5.00 



IF YOU WANT ANYTHING 
IN A GOOD WATCH 

SEE 

James Berry 

161 MAIN ST. 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Mill River Electric Lighting Co. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



W. F. TETRO 



Compliments of 


DEMERS' LUNCHROOM 


R. A. WARNER 


CANDY, CIGARS AND SODA 




LaSalle's Ice Cream 


FRESH MILK AND CREAM 


GOOD GULF GASOLINE 




AND MOTOR OILS 


DELIVERED DAILY 




WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 


HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 




Compliments of 


COMPLIMENTS OF 






Thos. F. Fleming 


T. F. LENIHAN 


12 CRAFTS AYE. 




Next to The Hampshire Bookshop 




FEMININE 


HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 






FOOTWEAR 



Compliments of 



M. M. Dunphy, DD. 



W. L. CHILSON 

TRUNKS, BAGS, AND LEATHER 

GOODS, MITTENS & GLOVES 

Twenty-three years on Main Street, now 
in Odd Fellows Building, 28 Center St. 



NORTHAMPTON, 



MASS. 



LET DANIEL OUTFIT YOU FOR 
GRADUATION 

YOUR OUTFIT WILL BE CORRECT 
BUT NOT EXPENSIVE 

Harry Daniel 

ASSOCIATES 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 


South Bend Poultry Farm 


S. Ellis Clark, Prop. 


Member of 


Certified Single- 


Comb R. I. Reds 


Phone 17-14 


Williamsburg 
Mass. 



"The Ledges 11 



BERKSHIRE TRAIL 



QUICK LUNCHES, FREE CAMPING 



G. H. BUCKMAN, Prop. 



Hillcrest Farm 



Mrs. Clayton Rboades 



SINGLE COMB RHODE ISLAND 



REDS 



BRED TO WIN, LAY AND PAY 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



J.G. Hayes, M.D. 



Compliments 

of a 

Friend 



Electric Wiring 



Fixtures 



Oil Burners and Electric Ice O Matic 



Refrigerators 



Suriner & McBreen 



Modern Education 

Our modern school systems put a lot of 
work upon growing eyes which puts a 
strain upon those with defective vision. 
Latent defects in the eyes of children 
should be carefully looked after. 

A little foresight now may keep them 
from wearing glases later and will help 
them in their studies. 

Let us examine their eyes 



CRD 



O. T. Dewhurst 



Tel. 1877 



Northampton, Mass. 



201 Main St. 
Northampton, 



Tel. 184-W 
Mass. 



SUITS 

MADE TO ORDER 

FROM $25.00 & UP 

Repairing & Remodeling 
Ladies, Gents and Children's Garments 

Relining Old Coats 

Cleaning, Dyeing and Pleating 

of all kinds 

CLEANING — DYEING 

PLEATING — FURRIER 

PADDOCK TAILORING CO. 



I. Fine, Inc. 

Army and Navy Store 

32 Pleasant St. Northampton 

Complete Line of 

Clothing, Shoes & Furnishings 

For Men and Young Men at Low Prices 



F. D. KEYES & SOX 



21 Masonic St. 
TEL. 374 



Northampton, Mass. 
Next to Fire Dept. 



Florists 



TEL. COX. 



127 MAIN ST. 



FLORENCE, MASS 



FLOWERS AND POTTED PLANTS 



A. H. RHODES 

LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING 
Goshen— DAILY EXPRESS— Northampton 

TEL.— WILLIAMSBURG— 68-12 


P. J. Murphy 

Tinning and Plumbing 

HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 
Tel. 113-4 


Compliments of 

Welcome's Lunch 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Open Day and Night 


T. P. LARKIN 

GENERAL MERCHANT 

Phone 8028-2 

HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

F. LaVALLEY 

Dermatician 


FLORENCE GARAGE 
COMPANY 

Graham-Paige 


WHEN IN NEED 

Clothing 

FURNISHINGS OR SHOES 
Try 

THE FLORENCE STORE 

90 Maple St., Florence, Mass. 
Phone 828 J. A. LONGTIN 



Pressing, Dry Cleaning 


The Haydenville House 


TEL. 1297-W 


HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 


CUSTOM TAILORS 


A Good Hotel for you to recommend to 


116 Main St. Northampton, Mass. 


your friends. 


W. KURKUL 


SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNERS 


GEO. L. BEALS 


E. J. Gare & Son 


GENERAL INSURANCE 


Jewelers 


79 MAIN ST. 


SEE US ABOUT CLASS PINS 


FLORENCE, MASS. 


112 Main Street 




NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 


Paul's Barber Shop 


Maple Crest Stock Farm 


LADY'S BOBS ARE STILL IN STYLE 


Fancy Apples 


Come In And Give Us A Try 


SWINE. MILK, & HOT-HOUSE LAMBS 




Sereno S. Clark, Prop. 


HAYDENYILLE, MASS. 


WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 


COMPLIMENTS 


Compliments of 


OF 




- 


WILLIAM DEVLIN 


J. G. PENNINGTON 


MEATS AND GROCERIES 




HAYDENYILLE, MASS. 



Valley View Filling Station 

Tydol Gasoline Veedol Oils 

WHEN LOOKING FOR A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

TRY OUR 

NEW UP-TO-THE-MINUTE LUNCH 

ON THE BERKSHIRE TRAIL, HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 

A. L. BEEBE, PROP. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



C. O. Carlson 



GOSHEN, 



MASS. 



PASTEURIZED MILK & CREAM 



Buy Milk That Will Keep 



Fred M. Hemenway 



YILLIAMSBURG, 



MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


* 

Compliments of 


FIRST NATIONAL 


The Clary Farm 


STORES 


Silas Snow, Proprietor 




Tel. 12-13 


WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 


WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 



C. F. JENKINS 



STATIONERY, MEDICINES, GREETING CARDS AND 

ICE CREAM 



WILLIAMSBURG, 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR YOUR 

Vacation 

Fishing' Tackle 

Tennis — Baseball 

Golf — Supplies 

at 
"That Good Hardware Store" 

FOSTER-FARRAR CO. 

162 MAIN STREET 
NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



FINANCIAL EDUCATION 

LEARNING HOW TO SAVE IS A FORM OF EDUCATION WHICH IS SECOND TO 
NONE, BUT ALL TOO LIKELY TO BE NEGLECTED. 

ONE MAY INDULGE IN THIS FORM OF EDUCATION BEFORE HE IS OLD 
ENOUGH TO GO TO SCHOOL. AND MAY CONTINUE AFTER HE HAS GRAD- 
UATED FROM COLLEGE. 

Haydenville Savings Bank 
Harden ville, Mass. 



The "E & J" Cigar Co, 



MANUFACTURERS OF CIGARS 



"E. & J's" and Fenbros 



WHOLESALERS OF CIGARS, CIGARETTES, TOBACCO 



23 Main St. NORTHAMPTON, MASS. Tel. 815-M 



C. A. TILEY 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. 



Hudson, Essex and Chevrolet 



Motor Cars and Trucks 



( harles A. Bisbee Homer R. Bisbee 

Tel. Chesterfield 4-2 Tel. Chesterfield 4-3 

BISBEE BROTHERS 

Dealers in all kinds of 

Grain, Feed, Fertilizers, Salt, Cement and Agricultural Tools 

BIRD & SONS, ROOFING PAPERS 
•» 

* 

International Harvester Co. McCormick Line Harvester Machinery 

Engines and Separators 

Building Material . Oliver Ploys and Cultivators 

A specialty of High Grade Grass Seed 
Get our prices on anything you need before ordering elsewhere 

Storehouses at Williamsburg and Bisbee, Mass. 

Tel. Williamsburg 60 Williamsburg, Mass., R. F.. D. 1 



The Haydenville 



Button Company 



You do not have to go out of Town for 

Insurance 

I am agent for two of the best Companies writing Auto Insurance 

of all kinds. 

ALSO FOR TWO GOOD COMPANIES WRITING 

Fire Insurance 

FOR YOUR BUILDINGS 
Give me a try 

WELLS G. BISBEE 

WILLIAMSBURG, MASS. TEL. 64 



TAYLOR & MELLON 



Interior and Exterior Finish 



DIMENSION LUMBER 



AND FRAMING 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



WJ^<^^^^^^^.Vffl^ 



THIS BOOK WAS PRINTED 
BY 



etcalf 
Printing & Publishing 
Co*, Inc. 



CRAFTS AVE. 



I 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS.